Our Cllr Dorothy #blog #blogging #food

Our Dorothy

Famous garden-food growth expert and cake stylist, first Ghanain Councillor (Cllr), Dorothy Akwaboah, is a woman of clout.

With an eye for taste and appreciation for the finer things in life , she’s usually the immaculately dressed one with soft speaking voice tones.

I think I had seen her in posted photos and heard of her before actually having a 1 to 1 with her – an encounter that turned out to be a world-shaking, disruptive, experiment to my tummy’s existence.

Someone had posted pictures of fish, Dorothy (D) prepared on a coal-fuelled stove boarded by a baked clay-based kitchen unit designed in a garden, in London! As if that was not unbelievably too good to be true, Dorothy is also fondly known for creating and delivering intricately beautifully-designed cakes for weddings and just about any event. She’s known to request pictures of bookcases, favourite toys and unique pieces which she works into a bake of art, earning her creations, the name, 2gd2kut.

I remember a quick chat with her at a social community function when I recall her telling me she baked and thought “she does not look like a baker” quietly spoken as she is.

Anyway, what does a cake stylist look like, I wonder?

Somehow we were fated to meet properly in the most unexpected way and place, hence the aim of this blog.

I had had a tiring weekend following a landmark birthday for my son and was recovering from this when Cllr D and I began to share Facebook messenger exchanges. This time it was one of many back and forth discussions to find a date to meet, to see for myself the beautiful garden and food artistry in pictures posted by another admirer on Facebook. What I had not imagined was the scale of the recreation of what D calls her grandmother’s kitchen with authentic serving of food using Ghanain dark, clay-based pots, laced with huge green banana leaves – the African way of presenting food.

While tossing dates back and forth between Facebook and texts we finally agreed a day, when I said, “how about today?”

Yes! But…. there were conditions. It would have to be around 6pm. That should be OK I thought as I began to pack up my stuff in the office and start towards the train station. A quick search on google revealed that I could make the time if I left within minutes. Charged with excitement, I bounced my usual walking style which felt like jogging and caught the train heading East. Embarking from the vessel and heading onto the street’s bus stop, I noticed the next bus was due in 8 minutes. A quick head calculation suggested that I could walk the distance in quicker time, so I opted for fresh air and exercise to get to Cllr’s.

Arriving, I knocked on the door and was ushered in to an immaculately clean home. Nothing like mine at all! Then I was guided as we walked into the back garden, and I gasped at the breathtaking beauty of it all – the planning, structure, the colours of herbs, trees, bushes of fruits and plants interwoven with such complementary features and detail. I mean there were strawberries next to tomatoes, cucumbers and spinach. You could appreciate the marvel of combining colours of fruits and flowers but that of plants was another adventure. I was so mesmerised with the grandeur of it all – the garden of Eden in London, I called it.

Our Dorothy

Famous garden-food growth expert and cake stylist, first Ghanain Councillor (Cllr), Dorothy Akwaboah, is a woman of clout.

With an eye for taste and appreciation for the finer things in life , she’s usually the immaculately dressed one with soft speaking voice tones.

I think I had seen her in posted photos and heard of her before actually having a 1 to 1 with her – an encounter that turned out to be a world-shaking, disruptive, experiment to my tummy’s existence.

Someone had posted pictures of fish, Dorothy (D) prepared on a coal-fuelled stove boarded by a baked clay-based kitchen unit designed in a garden, in London! As if that was not unbelievably too good to be true, Dorothy is also fondly known for creating and delivering intricately beautifully-designed cakes for weddings and just about any event. She’s known to request pictures of bookcases, favourite toys and unique pieces which she works into a bake of art, earning her creations, the name, 2gd2kut.

I remember a quick chat with her at a social community function when I recall her telling me she baked and thought “she does not look like a baker” quietly spoken as she is.

Anyway, what does a cake stylist look like, I wonder?

Somehow we were fated to meet properly in the most unexpected way and place, hence the aim of this blog.

I had had a tiring weekend following a landmark birthday for my son and was recovering from this when Cllr D and I began to share Facebook messenger exchanges. This time it was one of many back and forth discussions to find a date to meet, to see for myself the beautiful garden and food artistry in pictures posted by another admirer on Facebook. What I had not imagined was the scale of the recreation of what D calls her grandmother’s kitchen with authentic serving of food using Ghanain dark, clay-based pots, laced with huge green banana leaves – the African way of presenting food.

While tossing dates back and forth between Facebook and texts we finally agreed a day, when I said, “how about today?”

Yes! But…. there were conditions. It would have to be around 6pm. That should be OK I thought as I began to pack up my stuff in the office and start towards the train station. A quick search on google revealed that I could make the time if I left within minutes. Charged with excitement, I bounced my usual walking style which felt like jogging and caught the train heading East. Embarking from the vessel and heading onto the street’s bus stop, I noticed the next bus was due in 8 minutes. A quick head calculation suggested that I could walk the distance in quicker time, so I opted for fresh air and exercise to get to Cllr’s.

Arriving at her home, I knocked on the door and was ushered in to an immaculately clean home. Nothing like mine at all! Then I was guided as we walked into the back garden, and I gasped at the breathtaking beauty of it all – the planning, structure, the colours of herbs, trees, bushes of fruits and plants interwoven with such complementary features and detail. I mean there were strawberries next to tomatoes, cucumbers and spinach. You could appreciate the marvel of combining colours of fruits and flowers but that of plants was another adventure. I was so mesmerised with the grandeur of it all – the garden of Eden in London, I called it.

Tomatoes would grow

But not all in a row

Groundnuts did abound

They were also around

I even found yam

As you would on a farm

Green beans in pods

One purple, among the lot!

Strawberries so red

Were growing in the bed

Pears were ripe and sweet

To pick up with ease

I later climbed the black cherry tree

To D’s words of caution and grin

I found rosemary and spinach

Seeding in the low ditch.

As if that was not enough, D announced that she was holding and seasoning my fish. Mind you, she only had fresh fish and it was delivered to order and number. She shocked me, disrupted my thinking, in a good way when she declared, I’m going to go round the garden picking up fresh herbs to garnish your fish!

Who does that?

There was more.

Dotted around the garden almost every few yards were 🍅 . Everywhere. I could not resist picking them off the shrubs and eating them and it was good to be reminded to rinse them too. D also had a custom-made beautiful clay-coloured kitchen that revealed a tap on the side, so convenient, it was pure pleasure to reach out pick fruits, rinse and eat. I had to pick some pears too, fresh pears 🍐 directly off the tree. Delicious.

My first treat was a starter roast of corn-on-the-cob which was served in the wide, long, green banana leaf forming a layer to our British-Ghanain grandmothers dark coloured plate. What an experience. Next up, my usual serving of hot water, which was delivered in the brown tree-grown “calabash” I do not know the English equivalent. So. Sorry.

I was so taken as D gave a commentary, took my fish and walked up and down her food garden selecting herbs and spices that I asked to video the whole adventure. We can’t keep this to ourselves I thought. So when for-later-viewing, was not good enough, I decided to try a live video recording and our friends were joining in and commenting as far as USA, Nigeria and other exotic locations as you can imagine. Word spread like fire as people shared the video so it went viral and received 10,000 views in the first week.

Please be on the look out for her book: plot to pot.

The rest is history! Take a look at this.

See why: https://www.facebook.com/arinolaa/videos/10155787477282066/

As if that was not enough, D announced that she was holding and seasoning my fish. Mind you, she only had fresh fish and it was delivered to order and number. She shocked me, disrupted my thinking, in a good way when she declared, I’m going to go round the garden picking up fresh herbs to garnish your fish!

Who does that?

There was more.

Dotted around the garden almost every few yards were 🍅 . Everywhere. I could not resist picking them off the shrubs and eating them and it was good to be reminded to rinse them too. D also had a custom-made beautiful clay-coloured kitchen that revealed a tap on the side, so convenient, it was pure pleasure to reach out pick fruits, rinse and eat. I had to pick some pears too, fresh pears 🍐 directly off the tree. Delicious.

My first treat was a starter roast of corn-on-the-cob which was served in the wide, long, green banana leaf forming a layer to our British-Ghanain grandmothers dark coloured plate. What an experience. Next up, my usual serving of hot water, which was delivered in the brown tree-grown “calabash” I do not know the English equivalent. So. Sorry.

I was so taken as D gave a commentary, took my fish and walked up and down her food garden selecting herbs and spices that I asked to video the whole adventure. We can’t keep this to ourselves I thought. So when for-later-viewing, was not good enough, I decided to try a live video recording and our friends were joining in and commenting as far as USA, Nigeria and other exotic locations as you can imagine. Word spread like fire as people shared the video so it went viral and received 10,000 views in the first week.

When you meet her, ask her for the oil seasoned for six months, the one that’s brewing pepper, ginger, 🌿 herbs as well…

Please be on the look out for her book: plot to pot.

The rest is history! Take a look at this.

See why: https://www.facebook.com/arinolaa/videos/10155787477282066/

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